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Saturday, February 12, 2022, 8:30 AM – 4:00 PM Eastern Time

Recent Advances and Real-World Implications in Medical Oncology: A Daylong Multitumor Educational Symposium in Partnership with the North Carolina Oncology Association and the South Carolina Oncology Society

A CME-MOC/NCPD Accredited Event

Event Details

Location
The Westin Charlotte
601 South College Street
Charlotte, NC 28202
Hotel Phone: (704) 375-2600

Event Schedule
8:30 AM – 4:00 PM
Breakfast and lunch buffet to be provided

Meeting Room
To be announced

There is no registration fee for this event. However, preregistration is advised as seating is limited and you must be registered to attend the NCOA/SCOS 2022 Joint Conference.  
 
Faculty Presenting Virtually
Natalie S Callander, MD
Professor of Medicine
Director, Myeloma Clinical Program
Interim Director, Bone Marrow Transplant Program
University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center
Madison, Wisconsin

Robert Dreicer, MD, MS
Section Head, Medical Oncology
Deputy Director, University of Virginia Comprehensive Cancer Center
Associate Director for Clinical Research
Professor of Medicine and Urology
University of Virginia School of Medicine
Charlottesville, Virginia

Ian W Flinn, MD, PhD
Director of Lymphoma Research Program
Sarah Cannon Research Institute
Tennessee Oncology
Nashville, Tennessee

Howard S Hochster, MD
CINJ Associate Director, Clinical Research
Director Clinical Oncology Research
Rutgers Cancer Institute
New Brunswick, New Jersey


Ann S LaCasce, MD, MMSc
Director, Dana-Farber/Mass General Brigham Fellowship in Hematology/Oncology
Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Lymphoma Program
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, Massachusetts

S Vincent Rajkumar, MD
Edward W and Betty Knight Scripps Professor of Medicine
Mayo Clinic
Rochester, Minnesota

Sara M Tolaney, MD, MPH
Chief, Division of Breast Oncology
Associate Director, Susan F Smith Center for Women's Cancers
Senior Physician
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Associate Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Boston, Massachusetts

Additional faculty to be announced.

Moderator Hosting Virtually
Neil Love, MD
Research To Practice
Miami, Florida


This activity is supported by educational grants from Astellas and Seagen Inc, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Epizyme Inc, Janssen Biotech Inc, administered by Janssen Scientific Affairs LLC, Karyopharm Therapeutics, Seagen Inc, and Taiho Oncology Inc.

Agenda

Event Schedule
8:30 AM – 4:00 PM
Breakfast and lunch buffet to be provided

Final schedule and agenda will be provided in the coming weeks

CE Information

Target Audience
This live activity has been designed to meet the educational needs of medical oncologists, hematologists, hematology-oncology fellows, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and other allied cancer professionals involved in the treatment of cancer.

Learning Objectives

BREAST CANCER

  • Evaluate published research data to guide the selection and duration of neoadjuvant, adjuvant and extended-adjuvant therapy for patients with HER2-overexpressing localized breast cancer.
  • Implement a long-term clinical plan for patients with metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer, incorporating existing and recently approved anti-HER2 therapies.
  • Recognize common and rare side effects associated with novel anti-HER2 agents, and use this information to develop supportive management plans for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer undergoing treatment.
  • Evaluate the results of genomic assays and other patient- and treatment-related factors to personalize the use of adjuvant systemic therapy for newly diagnosed ER-positive breast cancer.
  • Consider available clinical trial findings with CDK4/6 inhibitors for localized ER-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, and assess the current roles of these agents in neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment.
  • Individualize the selection and sequencing of systemic therapy for patients with ER-positive metastatic breast cancer, considering age, menopausal status, prior treatment course, PIK3CA mutation status, comorbidities, symptomatology and extent and sites of disease.
  • Appreciate available Phase III data documenting the efficacy of adjuvant PARP inhibition for patients with high-risk HER2-negative early breast cancer with BRCA mutations, and consider the potential role of this strategy in clinical practice.
  • Review published research data supporting the use of chemotherapy in combination with anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies for patients with newly diagnosed high-risk localized or metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), and use this information to make appropriate treatment recommendations.
  • Evaluate published research findings guiding the selection and sequencing of available therapeutic agents for patients with PD-L1-negative TNBC or those who experience disease progression on front-line chemoimmunotherapy.
  • Appraise published efficacy and safety data with PARP inhibitors for patients with metastatic breast cancer harboring BRCA1/2 mutations, and consider the diagnostic and therapeutic implications for nonresearch care.
  • Assess the mechanisms of action of, early data with and ongoing clinical trials evaluating other novel agents and treatment strategies under development for localized and metastatic breast cancer.

LUNG CANCER

  • Evaluate available and emerging data documenting the efficacy and safety of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibody-based approaches to neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy for patients with nonmetastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
  • Appraise the FDA approval of anti-PD-L1 antibody consolidation therapy for patients with unresectable Stage III NSCLC who have not experienced disease progression after standard platinum-based chemotherapy concurrent with radiation therapy, and appropriately integrate this strategy into routine clinical practice.
  • Acknowledge the FDA approval of adjuvant EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy for localized NSCLC with an EGFR mutation, and identify patients for whom this novel approach would be warranted.
  • Review published research documenting the safety and efficacy of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors alone or in combination with other systemic approaches for metastatic NSCLC with an EGFR tumor mutation, and appropriately apply this information to patient care.
  • Assess the efficacy and safety of commercially available ALK inhibitors for patients with metastatic NSCLC with ALK rearrangements, and apply this understanding to selecting and sequencing these drugs as first- and later-line therapy.
  • Recollect other oncogenic pathways (ie, ROS1, RET, MET, HER2, KRAS) mediating the pathogenesis of tumors in unique patient subsets, and recall published and emerging data with commercially available and experimental agents exploiting these targets.
  • Review recent therapeutic advances related to the use of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy, chemobiologic therapy or anti-CTLA-4 antibodies for metastatic NSCLC, and discern how these approaches can be optimally employed in the management of this disease.
  • Develop a long-term care plan for patients with progressive NSCLC, considering exposure to prior systemic therapy, symptomatology, performance status and personal goals of treatment.
  • Appreciate available clinical trial findings informing the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors in combination with platinum-based chemotherapy for patients with previously untreated extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC).
  • Design an optimal approach to the clinical care of patients with progressive SCLC, considering the implications of prior therapeutic exposure, symptomatology and other factors.

GASTROINTESTINAL CANCERS

  • Develop a long-term care plan for patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer, considering biomarker profile, tumor location, prior exposure to systemic therapy, symptomatology, performance status (PS) and personal goals of treatment.
  • Use HER2 status, PD-L1 combined positive score and other clinical and biologic factors to optimize the selection and sequence of systemic therapy for locally advanced or metastatic gastric, gastroesophageal junction or esophageal cancer.
  • Consider age, PS, liver function and other clinical factors in the selection of first- and later-line therapy for patients with unresectable or metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma.
  • Recall clinical trial data with approved and investigational systemic interventions for localized, locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and establish an evidence-based approach to therapeutic selection for individual patients.
  • Apply available clinical research findings in the formation of personalized therapeutic approaches for unresectable and metastatic cancers of the biliary tract.
  • Appraise available and emerging data with investigational agents currently in clinical testing for gastrointestinal cancers, and where applicable, refer eligible patients for clinical trial participation.

GENITOURINARY CANCERS

  • Evaluate the published research database supporting the use of secondary hormonal agents in the management of nonmetastatic castration-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer, and apply this information in the discussion of nonresearch treatment options for patients.
  • Explore available data with the use of cytotoxic and secondary hormonal therapy for metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer to design effective treatment plans for patients.
  • Establish an evidence-based approach to the selection and sequencing of available therapeutic options for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), considering age, comorbidities, prior therapeutic exposure and other clinical and biologic factors.
  • Assess the available and emerging research database supporting the use of PARP inhibitors for patients with mCRPC, and discern how to optimally incorporate these agents into current and future clinical management algorithms.
  • Appreciate available Phase III data documenting the efficacy of PSMA-targeted radioligand therapy in patients with progressive PSMA-positive mCRPC, and consider the potential clinical role of this strategy.
  • Effectively apply evidence-based research and other clinical and biologic factors in the best-practice selection of first-line therapy for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC).
  • Develop a rational approach to the sequencing of systemic therapies for patients with advanced RCC that progresses on first-line treatment, incorporating multikinase inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors, immunotherapeutic agents and other therapies.
  • Review available clinical trial evidence with immune checkpoint inhibitors as monotherapy or as maintenance after platinum-based chemotherapy in the treatment of newly diagnosed metastatic urothelial bladder carcinoma (UBC), and determine the current utility of these agents in clinical practice.
  • Recall pivotal clinical trial findings leading to the FDA approval of novel compounds with unique mechanisms of action for previously treated locally advanced or metastatic UBC, and identify patients for whom these approaches would be appropriate.
  • Consider available data supporting the use of anti-PD-1 antibody therapy for nonmetastatic RCC or UBC, and determine how this strategy can be appropriately integrated into patient care.
  • Reflect on available and emerging data with investigational agents and strategies currently in testing for prostate cancer, RCC and UBC, and where applicable, refer eligible patients for clinical trial participation.

CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA AND LYMPHOMAS

  • Individualize the selection and sequencing of systemic therapy for patients with newly diagnosed or relapsed/refractory (R/R) chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), considering clinical presentation, age, performance status (PS), biomarker profile and coexisting medical conditions.
  • Understand published research data informing the selection, sequencing or combining of available therapeutic agents in the nonresearch care of patients with previously untreated or R/R follicular lymphoma (FL).
  • Recognize the mechanisms of action, efficacy and safety of approved and investigational agents in the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) to determine the current and potential utility of those agents in clinical practice.
  • Consider patient age, PS and other clinical and biologic factors in the up-front and subsequent treatment of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL).
  • Incorporate available and emerging therapeutic strategies into the best-practice management of newly diagnosed and R/R Hodgkin lymphoma (HL).
  • Assess available clinical trial findings informing the use of CD19-directed CAR (chimeric antigen receptor) T-cell therapy for R/R DLBCL, MCL and FL, and counsel appropriately selected patients regarding the potential benefits of this strategy.
  • Implement a plan of care to recognize and manage side effects and toxicities associated with existing and recently approved systemic therapies for CLL, FL, HL, MCL and DLBCL to support quality of life and continuation of treatment.
  • Recall new data with agents and strategies currently under investigation for CLL and various lymphoma subtypes, and discuss ongoing trial opportunities with eligible patients.

MULTIPLE MYELOMA

  • Customize the selection of first-line therapy for patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM), considering new clinical research findings and patient- and disease-related factors, including cytogenetic profile and fitness for stem cell transplant.
  • Appreciate clinical trial data informing the front-line use of monoclonal antibody therapy directed at CD38 for patients with MM eligible or ineligible for stem cell transplant, and effectively identify when and how this strategy should be integrated into clinical management.
  • Consider published research and other clinical factors in the best-practice selection, sequencing and combining of established agents and regimens in the care of patients with relapsed/refractory MM.
  • Develop an understanding of the mechanisms of action of and pivotal clinical trial findings with recently FDA-approved novel therapies to facilitate their integration into MM management algorithms.
  • Evaluate the biologic rationale for the use of CAR (chimeric antigen receptor) T-cell therapy directed at BCMA (B-cell maturation antigen) as a targeted therapeutic strategy for MM, and identify patients for whom this novel approach should be considered.
  • Recall the design of ongoing clinical trials evaluating novel agents and strategies for MM, and counsel appropriate patients about availability and participation.

Accreditation Statements
Research To Practice is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Research To Practice is accredited as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation (ANCC).

CME Credit Designation Statement
Research To Practice designates this live activity for a maximum of 5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

CME and ABIM MOC credit form links will be emailed to each participant within 5 business days of the activity.

NCPD Credit Designation Statements
This educational activity for 5 contact hours is provided by Research To Practice.

This activity is awarded 5 ANCC pharmacotherapeutic contact hours.

To obtain a certificate of completion and receive credit for this event, nurses must return a completed Educational Assessment and Credit Form for the modules they attend. The credit form links will be emailed to participants within 5 business days of the activity.

American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) — Maintenance of Certification (MOC)
Successful completion of this CME activity, which includes participation in the evaluation component, enables the participant to earn up to 5 Medical Knowledge MOC points in the American Board of Internal Medicine’s (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program. Participants will earn MOC points equivalent to the amount of CME credits claimed for the activity. It is the CME activity provider’s responsibility to submit participant completion information to ACCME for the purpose of granting ABIM MOC credit.

Please note, this program has been specifically designed for the following ABIM specialties: medical oncology and hematology.

Personal information and data sharing: Research To Practice aggregates deidentified user data for program-use analysis, program development, activity planning and site improvement. We may provide aggregate and deidentified data to third parties, including commercial supporters. We do not share or sell personally identifiable information to any unaffiliated third parties or commercial supporters. Please see our privacy policy at ResearchToPractice.com/Privacy-Policy for more information. For those clinicians wishing to receive ABIM MOC credit for attending, you will receive an email after the event with instructions.

Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation (ONCC)/Individual Learning Needs Assessment (ILNA) Certification Information
This program will be submitted for ONCC/ILNA certification.

Unlabeled/Unapproved Uses Notice
There is no implied or real endorsement of any product by Research To Practice, ACCME or the ANCC. Any off-label use as declared by the FDA will be identified.

Content Validation and Disclosures
Research To Practice (RTP) is committed to providing its participants with high-quality, unbiased and state-of-the-art education and adheres to the ACCME’s Standards for Integrity and Independence in Accredited Continuing Education. Any individuals in a position to control the content of an accredited continuing education activity, including faculty, planners, reviewers and others, are required to disclose all relevant financial relationships with ineligible entities (commercial interests). All relevant conflicts of interest will have been mitigated prior to the commencement of this activity. In addition, all activity content is reviewed by RTP scientific staff and an external, independent physician reviewer for fair balance, scientific objectivity of studies referenced and patient care recommendations. Financial disclosures will be provided in meeting course materials.

Research To Practice CME/NCPD Planning Committee Members, Staff and Reviewers — Planners, scientific staff and independent reviewers for Research To Practice have no relevant conflicts of interest to disclose.

Supporters
This activity is supported by educational grants from Astellas and Seagen Inc, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Epizyme Inc, Janssen Biotech Inc, administered by Janssen Scientific Affairs LLC, Karyopharm Therapeutics, Seagen Inc, and Taiho Oncology Inc.

Location

The Westin Charlotte
601 South College Street
Charlotte, NC 282029
Hotel Phone: (704) 375-2600

Meeting Room
To be announced

North Carolina Oncology Association (NCOA) and South Carolina Oncology Society (SCOC) members, please be sure to contact the Westin Charlotte directly to book accommodations in the NCOA/SCOS room block.

Directions
The Westin Charlotte is the host hotel for the North Carolina Oncology Association (NCOA) and South Carolina Oncology Society (SCOS) Joint Conference.

 

Registration

This live activity has been designed to meet the educational needs of medical oncologists, hematologists, hematology-oncology fellows, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and other allied cancer professionals involved in the treatment of cancer.

There is no registration fee for this event. However, preregistration is advised as seating is limited and you must be registered to attend the NCOA/SCOS 2022 Joint Conference.

​ ​
Registration for clinicians in practice/healthcare professionals

I am a practicing physician, fellow, nurse or other healthcare provider involved in the treatment of cancer.

Registration for clinicians in practice »
 
​ ​
STAND BY Registration other/industry professionals*

Please note, a limited number of seats are currently available for nonclinicians on a first come, first served basis. We will inform you if your registration has been approved.

Registration for other/industry professionals »

* Individuals employed by for-profit organizations, including financial institutions, biotech or pharmaceutical companies
Registration for groups
If you are registering a group (more than 1 person) for this event, please contact us at Meetings@ResearchToPractice.com or (800) 233-6153.
To ensure seating, please check in at our onsite registration desk at least 30 minutes before the start of the meeting. We cannot guarantee seating after the start of the program.

Meal service will be provided to those who attend the program, based on availability.

​ Photography and/or video recording may be taken during the educational program by Research To Practice and used in future educational programs.

​ Research To Practice fully complies with the legal requirements of the ADA. If you are in need of assistance (ie, physical, dietary, et cetera), please contact us prior to the event at (800) 233-6153.