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New Biological Insights and Recent Therapeutic Advances in the Management of Acute and Chronic Leukemias and Myelodysplastic Syndromes
Released August 2015

Video excerpts from a clinical investigator Think Tank featuring perspectives from Drs Jennifer R Brown, Hagop M Kantarjian, Charles A Schiffer, B Douglas Smith, David P Steensma and Wendy Stock on emerging data and recent therapeutic advances in the treatment of acute and chronic leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes. (Video Program)

CE Disclosures and Faculty Information

  • TARGET AUDIENCE
    This activity is intended for medical oncologists, hematology-oncology fellows and other healthcare providers involved in the treatment of hematologic cancers.

    OVERVIEW OF ACTIVITY
    Hematologic cancers include the lymphomas, the leukemias, multiple myeloma and other related disorders (eg, myelodysplastic syndromes [MDS], myeloproliferative diseases) stemming from lymphoid and myeloid progenitor cell lines. Taken together, it is estimated that approximately 162,020 new lymphoid, myeloid and leukemic cancer cases will be identified in the United States in the year 2015 and 56,630 individuals will die from these diseases. Importantly, more than 60 drug products are currently labeled for use in the management of hematologic cancers, and although this extensive list of available treatment options is reassuring for patients and oncology healthcare professionals, it poses a challenge to the practicing clinician who must maintain up-to-date knowledge of appropriate clinical management strategies across a vast spectrum of liquid and solid tumors.

    By reviewing the available clinical trial data and relevant case scenarios, this initiative will provide insight into the gaps in medical knowledge and illuminate treatment ambiguities pertinent to the management of acute and chronic leukemias and MDS. To address these issues, this CME program brings together leading clinical investigators to provide biological insights into the recent therapeutic advances in the management of these cancers.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    • Appraise recent data on therapeutic advances and changing practice standards in the management of select acute and chronic leukemias and MDS, and refine or validate existing treatment algorithms based on discussion of this information.
    • Appreciate the FDA approvals of novel targeted agents indicated for the treatment of newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and discern how these treatments can be appropriately integrated into clinical practice.
    • Recognize evidence-based therapeutic options for patients with progressive chronic myeloid leukemia.
    • Review existing and evolving clinical trial data to recommend safe therapeutic alternatives for patients with acute myeloid leukemia, including acute promyelocytic leukemia, and increase knowledge regarding investigational options designed for patients who are not candidates for intensive therapy.
    • Apply the results of emerging clinical research to optimize treatment for young adult and adult patients with newly diagnosed and recurrent acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    • Counsel patients with MDS about supportive and systemic treatment options to manage disease-related cytopenias and minimize leukemic progression.

    ACCREDITATION STATEMENT
    Research To Practice is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    CME credit is no longer available for this issue

    CREDIT DESIGNATION STATEMENT

    CME credit is no longer available for this issue

    HOW TO USE THIS CME ACTIVITY
    This CME activity contains both audio and print components. The participant should review the CME information, listen to the audio MP3s and read the text portion. The text portion of this activity contains edited comments, clinical trial schemas, graphics and references that supplement the audio MP3s, as well as links to relevant full-text articles, abstracts, trial information and other web resources.

    CME credit is no longer available for this issue

    CONTENT VALIDATION AND DISCLOSURES
    Research To Practice (RTP) is committed to providing its participants with high-quality, unbiased and state-of-the-art education. We assess potential conflicts of interest with faculty, planners and managers of CME activities. Real or apparent conflicts of interest are identified and resolved through a conflict of interest resolution process. In addition, all activity content is reviewed by both a member of the RTP scientific staff and an external, independent physician reviewer for fair balance, scientific objectivity of studies referenced and patient care recommendations.

    FACULTY — The following faculty (and their spouses/partners) reported real or apparent conflicts of interest, which have been resolved through a conflict of interest resolution process:

    Jennifer R Brown, MD, PhD
    Director, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Center
    Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
    Boston, Massachusetts

    Advisory Committee: Celgene Corporation, Emergent BioSolutions Inc, Gilead Sciences Inc, Janssen Biotech Inc, MorphoSys, Pharmacyclics Inc, ProNAi Therapeutics Inc; Consulting Agreements: Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc, Celgene Corporation, Emergent BioSolutions Inc, Genentech BioOncology, Gilead Sciences Inc, GlaxoSmithKline, Janssen Biotech Inc, MorphoSys, Pharmacyclics Inc, ProNAi Therapeutics Inc, Roche Laboratories Inc.

    Hagop M Kantarjian, MD
    Chairman and Professor, Leukemia Department
    The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
    Houston, Texas

    No real or apparent conflicts of interest to disclose.

    Charles A Schiffer, MD
    Professor of Medicine and Oncology
    Joseph Dresner Chair for Hematologic Malignancies
    Chief, Multidisciplinary Leukemia/Lymphoma Group
    Wayne State University School of Medicine
    Karmanos Cancer Institute
    Detroit, Michigan

    Advisory Committee: Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc, Eisai Inc, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Takeda Oncology; Consulting Agreement: Celgene Corporation; Contracted Research: Amgen Inc, Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Celgene Corporation, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Pfizer Inc, Takeda Oncology; Research Support: MedImmune Inc; Other Remunerated Activities: Pfizer Inc, Takeda Oncology.

    B Douglas Smith, MD
    Associate Professor of Oncology
    Division of Hematologic Malignancies
    The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins
    Baltimore, Maryland

    Advisory Committee: Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Celgene Corporation, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Pfizer Inc.

    David P Steensma, MD
    Faculty Member, Adult Leukemia Program
    Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    Associate Professor of Medicine
    Harvard Medical School
    Boston, Massachusetts

    Advisory Committee: Amgen Inc, Celgene Corporation, Genoptix Inc.

    Wendy Stock, MD, MA
    Professor of Medicine
    University of Chicago
    Director, Leukemia Program
    Chicago, Illinois

    Advisory Committee: Amgen Inc, Gilead Sciences Inc, Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals Inc.

    MODERATOR — Dr Love is president and CEO of Research To Practice, which receives funds in the form of educational grants to develop CME activities from the following commercial interests: Dr Love is president and CEO of Research To Practice, which receives funds in the form of educational grants to develop CME activities from the following commercial interests: AbbVie Inc, Amgen Inc, Astellas Scientific and Medical Affairs Inc, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Biodesix Inc, bioTheranostics Inc, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc, Boston Biomedical Pharma Inc, Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Celgene Corporation, Clovis Oncology, Daiichi Sankyo Inc, Dendreon Corporation, Eisai Inc, Exelixis Inc, Foundation Medicine, Genentech BioOncology, Genomic Health Inc, Gilead Sciences Inc, ImmunoGen Inc, Incyte Corporation, Janssen Biotech Inc, Jazz Pharmaceuticals Inc, Lilly, Medivation Inc, Merck, Myriad Genetic Laboratories Inc, NanoString Technologies, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Novocure, Onyx Pharmaceuticals, an Amgen subsidiary, Pharmacyclics Inc, Prometheus Laboratories Inc, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Sanofi, Seattle Genetics, Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals Inc, Sirtex Medical Ltd, Spectrum Pharmaceuticals Inc, Taiho Oncology Inc, Takeda Oncology, Teva Oncology, Tokai Pharmaceuticals Inc and VisionGate Inc.

    RESEARCH TO PRACTICE STAFF AND EXTERNAL REVIEWERS — The scientific staff and reviewers for Research To Practice have no real or apparent conflicts of interest to disclose.

    This educational activity contains discussion of published and/or investigational uses of agents that are not indicated by the Food and Drug Administration. Research To Practice does not recommend the use of any agent outside of the labeled indications. Please refer to the official prescribing information for each product for discussion of approved indications, contraindications and warnings. The opinions expressed are those of the presenters and are not to be construed as those of the publisher or grantors.

    This activity is supported by educational grants from Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals Inc, Celgene Corporation, Genentech BioOncology, Gilead Sciences Inc, Jazz Pharmaceuticals Inc, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation and Teva Oncology.

    Hardware/Software Requirements:
    A high-speed Internet connection
    A monitor set to 1280 x 1024 pixels or more
    Internet Explorer 7 or later, Firefox 3.0 or later, Chrome, Safari 3.0 or later
    Adobe Flash Player 10.2 plug-in or later
    Adobe Acrobat Reader
    (Optional) Sound card and speakers for audio

    Last review date: August 2015
    Expiration date: August 2016

Acknowledge and close

Watch video
(WIFI is recommended for best performance):

Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML)
Clinical factors affecting the selection of tyrosine kinase inhibitors as initial therapy for CML
Decision-making on discontinuation of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy for patients with CML
A 56-year-old man with CML develops pleural effusions during treatment with dasatinib
Clinical experience with omacetaxine mepesuccinate for patients with CML
Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)
A 65-year-old man with higher-risk CLL who developed significant cytopenias and transaminitis on FC/obinutuzumab
Phase Ib GALTON study of obinutuzumab with fludarabine/cyclophosphamide or bendamustine as initial therapy for CLL
Potential role of lenalidomide in the treatment of CLL
Rituximab or ofatumumab as maintenance therapy for CLL
Clinical implications of the CLL11 trial of obinutuzumab/chlorambucil in patients with untreated CLL and comorbidities
Benefits and risks associated with ibrutinib and idelalisib for relapsed/refractory CLL
A 64-year-old woman with del(11q) CLL receives idelalisib after disease progression on multiple treatment regimens
Clinical experience with the Bcl-2 inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199) as treatment for relapsed/refractory CLL
Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) and Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL)
Clinical data with and nonresearch use of the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib for the treatment of AML
Efficacy of azacitidine for the treatment of AML in elderly patients
A 65-year-old woman presenting with hemiparesis and an unusually high white blood cell count is diagnosed with APL
Recent clinical data with the polo-like kinase inhibitor volasertib in elderly patients with AML
Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS)
Clinical landscape of emerging research in MDS
A 77-year-old woman is diagnosed with MDS after presenting with pancytopenia and fatigue
Discontinuation of azacitidine therapy for patients with MDS and worsening cytopenia
Lenalidomide for patients with transfusion-dependent, low-risk MDS without del(5q)
Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)
Clinical management of ALL in the community compared to tertiary care settings
Comparison of adult and pediatric treatment regimens for ALL and the use of pediatric regimens in the adult population
Benefits and risks associated with the inclusion of asparaginase in treatment regimens for ALL
Emerging data with the biallelic T-cell engaging monoclonal antibody blinatumomab as treatment for ALL
Magnitude of clinical responses observed with chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapy in ALL